The 13 Best Bad Credit Loans of 2022

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If you have a bad credit score, you might believe you’re out of options when money is tight — but that doesn’t have to be the case.

You’re not relegated to predatory payday loans and high-interest credit cards. Lots of lenders have options that let you borrow money through personal loans at relatively low cost — some of them even cater specifically to borrowers with low or no credit scores.

In this guide, we share some of the best bad credit loans available for all types of financial situations. Compare your options to see potential interest rates, loan amounts, credit scores and repayment terms — and keep an eye out for lenders with alternative assessment criteria that could help you get approved.

13 Best Bad Credit Loans at a Glance

Company APR with Autopay Loan Amounts Min. Credit Score
SeedFi 7.42% – 29.99% $300 – $4,000 520
Happy Money 5.99% – 24.99% $5,000 – $40,000 600
Stilt 7.99% – 25% $1,000 – $35,000 None
Universal Credit 8.93% – 35.93% $1,000 – $50,000 560
Best Egg 5.99% – 35.99% $2,000 – $50,000 640
LendingClub 7.04% – 35.89% $1,000 – $40,000 600
Prosper 7.95% – 35.99% $2,000 – $40,000 600
OneMain Financial 18% – 35.99% $1,500 – $20,000 None
Avant 9.95% – 35.99% $2,000 – $35,000 580
NetCredit 19.9% – 155% (range varies by state) $1,000 – $10,000 None
Upgrade 5.94% – 35.97% $1,000 – $50,000 580
LendingPoint 5.94% – 35.97% $2,000 – $36,500 600
Upstart 5.22% – 35.99% $1,000 – $50,000 580

SeedFi

Best for Building Credit and Savings

Key Features

  • Build savings while you repay
  • Two monthly payments aligned to payday
  • Access $300 to $4,000 today

SeedFi’s Borrow and Grow plan is a small, low-interest loan that helps you build credit and savings at the same time. You’ll get a portion of your loan ($300 to $4,000) up front, then unlock a saved portion ($650 to $4,000) once your payment plan is finished. Payments are between $40 and $160 every two weeks, with dates aligned to your paydays. SeedFi is available in 35 states and Washington D.C.

SeedFi

APR

7.42% – 29.99%

Loan amount

$300 to $4,000

Minimum credit score

520

Happy Money

Best for Debt Consolidation Loans

Key Features

  • Loans between $5,000 and $40,000
  • Pay off credit card debt
  • No prepayment fees

Happy Money’s Payoff Loan lends between $5,000 and $40,000 over two to five years, specifically designed to pay off credit card debt. The company can send you the money or pay your creditors directly, and you choose which type of payment plan works best for you: lowest interest, lowest monthly payment or shortest term.

Happy Money

APR range

5.99% – 24.99%

Loan amounts

$5,000 – $40,000

Minimum credit score

600

Upstart

Best for Borrowers Without Traditional Credit History

Key Features

  • AI-powered lending for partner banks
  • Considers more than your credit history
  • Loan amounts as low as $1,000

Upstart is a platform that supports partner lenders in making loans to borrowers using proprietary AI to assess creditworthiness. The platform looks at factors beyond your traditional credit score (though it also does a credit check), including education and income, so you could have a higher chance of approval if you have a low or no credit score but other positive factors.

Upstart

APR range

5.22% – 35.99%

Loan amounts

$1,000 – $50,000

Minimum credit score

580

Stilt

Best for Non-Citizens and Visa Holders

Key Features

  • APR: 7.99% – 25%
  • Loan amounts: $1,000 – $35,000
  • Minimum credit score: None

Stilt is designed for non-citizens and visa holders in the U.S. It’s one of few lending options for borrowers without a Social Security number — all you need to apply is a U.S. address and bank account. You also don’t need to have a U.S. credit history. The company looks at factors like your education, employment and utility payments to determine whether to lend to you.

Stilt

APR range

7.99% – 25%

Loans amounts

$1,000 – $35,000

Minimum credit score

None

Universal Credit

Best for Credit Scores Below 600

Key Features

  • Funding within one day
  • Fixed interest rate
  • Rate discounts for debt pay off

Universal Credit offers personal loans for borrowers with bad credit, with a preference for debt consolidation and pay off. You could receive a rate discount of one to two percentage points if you use Universal Credit to pay off credit card debt directly.

Universal Credit

APR range

8.93% – 35.93%

Loan amounts

$1,000 – $50,000

Minimum credit score

560

Best Egg

Best for Low Interest rates

Key Features

  • Funding within three days
  • Adjust your payment due date
  • Variety of terms

Best Egg offers personal loans in a broad range of amounts to borrowers with fair or good credit. You can take out a loan between $2,000 to $50,000 (depending on your state) with a repayment period of two, three, four or five years. Interest rates can be as low as 5.99%, fairly competitive for bad credit loans.

Best Egg

APR range

.99% – 35.99%

Loan amounts

$2,000 – $50,000

Minimum credit score

640

LendingClub

Best for Typical Personal Loans

Key Features

  • Borrow up to $40,000
  • Funding within 48 hours
  • No prepayment penalty

LendingClub is an online lender offering personal loans and bank accounts. You can borrow as little as $1,000 and receive funds within two days. You might know the platform for peer-to-peer lending, which is how it started, but as of 2020, LendingClub only offers traditional personal loans.

LendingClub

ARP range

7.04% – 35.89%

Loan amounts

$1,000 – $40,000

Minimum credit score

600

Prosper

Best for Peer-to-Peer Borrowing

Key Features

  • Peer-to-peer lending
  • Next-day funding
  • No prepayment penalty

Through peer-to-peer lending with Prosper, borrowers can get between $2,000 and $40,000 in personal loans, and individuals and institutions can invest to earn returns on the debt. Prosper manages the loan for you, but your money comes from those investors, not just banks, and any interest you pay goes back to them too.

Prosper

ARP range

7.95% – 35.99%

Loan amounts

$2,000 – $40,000

Minimum credit score

600

OneMain Financial

Best for No Minimum Credit Score

Key Features

  • No minimum credit score
  • Secured loans available
  • Interest rates from 18% – 35.99%

OneMain financial makes secured or unsecured personal loans to borrowers with no minimum credit score. You can borrow up to $20,000 with a term of two, three, four or five years. The trade off for the flexibility in borrowing is relatively high interest rates: APRs range from 18% to 35.99%.

OneMain Financial

APR range

18% – 35.99%

Loan amounts

$1,500 – $20,000

Minimum credit score

None

Avant

Best for Fair Credit Loans

Key Features

  • Next-day funding
  • Minimum 580 credit score
  • Not available in New York

Avant is a personal loan lender that’s friendly to fair-credit borrowers: Most Avant borrowers have credit scores between 600 and 700, but you may be eligible for a loan with a credit score as low as 580. Get a loan for up to $35,000 with funding as soon as the next day after you’re approved.

Avant

APR range

9.95% – 35.99%

Loan amounts

$2,000 – $35,000

Minimum credit score

580

NetCredit

Best for Small Loans

Key Features

  • Next-day funding
  • No prepayment penalty
  • Interest rates between 19.9% and 155%

NetCredit offers both personal loans and lines of credit for borrowers with no minimum credit score. You can borrow between $1,000 and $10,000 — but interest rates might be hefty. Depending on your state, interest rates range from 19.9% and up to 155% in limited states.

NetCredit

APR range

19.9% – 155% (range varies by state)

Loan amounts

$1,000 – $10,000

Minimum credit score

None

Upgrade

Best for Raising Your Credit Score

Key Features

  • Checking, credit and loans in one platform
  • No prepayment penalties
  • Next day funding

Upgrade is a financial platform for checking, a credit card, credit monitoring and personal loans, all designed to pay off debt and improve your credit score. The credit card is tied to a credit line with a set pay off date, and the personal loan is designed with quick repayment in mind. Plus, free credit monitoring helps you keep an eye on your progress.

Upgrade

APR range

5.94% – 35.97%

Loan amounts

$1,000 – $50,000

Minimum credit score

580

LendingPoint

Best for Fair Credit Borrowers

Key Features

  • Next-day funding
  • No co-sign loans
  • Not available in Nevada or West Virginia

LendingPoint offers personal loans with a minimum credit score of 600 and looks at factors beyond your FICO score to make decisions. You can get an unsecured personal loan or apply for e-commerce or point-of-sale financing for your business. No co-signed loans might make this option less attr active for some low-credit borrowers.

LendingPoint

APR range

9.99% – 35.99%

Loan amounts

$2,000 – $36,500

Minimum credit score

600

Types of Loans for Bad Credit

Often, the loans and credit available to borrowers with bad credit are less abundant than those for borrowers with good or excellent credit. But you do have options!

Look into these types of loans for bad credit:

  • Debt consolidation loan. This is a type of personal loan where the loan proceeds go to your creditors instead of directly to you. Debt consolidation or refinancing is a way to pay off high-interest debt like credit cards and pare down your monthly obligations to a single payment.
  • Secured loan. A secured personal loan is one where you put up collateral, like a car (title), boat, jewelry or something else of value. If you don’t repay the loan on time, the lender will own the collateral. These types of loans are usually easier to get when you have bad credit, because your collateral reduces the lender’s risk of losing money if you don’t repay.
  • Unsecured loan. An unsecured personal loan is one without collateral to back it. Typical lenders require good or excellent credit for an unsecured loan, but the lenders in this list make these loans available to borrowers with lower credit scores.
  • Home equity loans. If you have a low credit score but you’ve paid off a lot (or all) of the mortgage for a home you own, you could take out a loan based on how much your home is worth. These loans tend to come relatively easily, because they’re backed by your home, which is an incredibly valuable asset.
  • Credit builder loans. These loans, from lenders like SeedFi, may be structured as personal loans or something else, but they function similarly. They often come in low amounts so you have low monthly payments, and part of the loan might be withheld in a savings account as collateral until you repay.
  • Payday loans. If you can’t qualify for a traditional personal loan, payday lenders are lying in wait to get you money in an emergency. Payday loans are meant to carry you between paychecks, and you qualify based on your expected income rather than your credit score. They come with effective interest rates of around 400% — or about $15 to $10 for every $100 you borrow — which can compound quickly if you’re unable to repay within two weeks.

Loan Risks to Consider

When you take out a personal loan for any reason, consider the potential risks in two main categories: the cost to you and the effect on your credit score.

The main cost you’ll pay on a loan is the interest, but look out for all these common costs:

  • APR. Annual percentage rate is the annualized amount you’ll pay over the amount of your loan. Bad credit personal loan rates tend to fall between 9% and 35%. The lower your credit score and the longer your repayment period, the higher your rate will likely be.
  • Origination fees. Most lenders charge a fee out of your loan right up front, typically as a percentage of the loan amount. An origination fee could lop off around 2% or 3% of your loan before you receive it, so count that in when you figure out how much to borrow.
  • Late fees. If any monthly payment is late, some lenders charge a late fee that’s a percentage of the payment due or a flat fee. Those fees get added to your loan balance and then accrue interest, so they can add up over time.
  • Prepayment penalties. Some lenders charge you a fee if you repay ahead of schedule. This is as silly as it sounds, so it’s becoming pretty rare. But it’s an option, so keep an eye out for prepayment fees in your loan agreement, and plan your repayment accordingly.

Taking out a personal loan can affect your credit score in these major ways:

  • Application for credit. When you apply for credit — a loan, a new credit card, a mortgage, etc. — lenders typically report the request to credit bureaus. Any request for credit can briefly knock your credit score down, and multiple requests in a short period can have a serious impact in the short term (because lenders don’t want to lend to someone taking on a bunch of debt all at once). A soft credit check for prequalification doesn’t get reported, so comparing rates doesn’t hurt your score.
  • Debt-to-income ratio. Your monthly loan payment gets added to your debt-to-income ratio (DTI), the difference between how much you make each month and how much you owe in debt payments. A high DTI, above 35% to 45%, can hurt your ability to get additional credit or loans, including a mortgage.
  • Payment history. Make on-time payments, and your credit score will likely improve! Just make sure the lender reports payments to all three credit bureaus (they usually mention that on their site or in their FAQs, or you can ask customer service). If you make late payments or don’t repay the loan in full, that’ll be a negative mark on your credit report.

Who Can Take out a Loan With Bad Credit?

Many lenders have a minimum credit score requirement, but your score isn’t the only factor that determines your eligibility for a loan. You may be able to take out a loan with bad credit if any of these factors are favorable:

  • Minimum credit history. Lenders might have a low or no credit score requirement, but they could still have a minimum credit history — how long you’ve had activity on your credit report. The minimum is usually three years, but consult each lender to learn theirs.
  • Debt-to-income ratio. Lenders consider the other debt you’re repaying when assessing your ability to repay their loan. Your DTI tells them how much room you have to add an extra debt payment to your bills each month.
  • Income. With any credit score, lenders look for a stable source of regular income to make sure you have a way to make monthly payments. This number could be even more important if you have a low credit score, because some lenders lean more heavily on this factor to determine your eligibility.
  • Education. Some lenders look at your education to assess the likelihood you’ll earn the money necessary to repay a loan. This can be especially helpful for recent grads with a short credit history or no credit score.
  • Bill pay history. Companies often report delinquent bills to credit bureaus, which are reflected in your credit score. But a positive payment history for everyday bills and rent don’t traditionally help your score. Some lenders use alternative assessment methods that include positive payment history, and you can sign up for third-party platforms that’ll report your history to credit bureaus to help your score.

How to Get a Loan If You Have Bad Credit

Follow these steps to get a personal loan with a low credit score:

  • Consider your options. Ask whether a personal is the best way to cover your costs. Maybe you could avoid the debt and instead delay the purchase or negotiate an expense you’re facing.
  • Review your finances. When you review loan offers, you’ll want to know what you can comfortably pay each month for a few years.
  • Check your credit score. Applying for a loan dings your credit report, so you don’t want to apply for loans you aren’t confident you’ll qualify for. Check your score first, then find lenders that match your situation.
  • Compare lenders. Check reviews like this to compare loan offers side by side. This lets you see lender options and requirements to find the ones that align with your needs.
  • Get pre-qualified. This is how you find out whether you’re likely to get accepted by a specific lender based on your specific financial information. Give a little information to go through a soft credit check that won’t affect your score, and see pre-qualified offers. Then you can decide whether it’s worth applying in full.
  • Review the loan details. Before you put in an official application, check the details of the offer carefully. Do the repayment period and monthly payment fit with your financial plan?
  • Complete an application. Once you choose a loan, fill out an application with the lender. They’ll do a hard credit check and — if you were accurate and honest on the initial check — likely approve you for the loan.
  • Receive the funds. If you’re using a loan to pay off debts, the funds usually go directly to your other lenders. If you’re getting funds for yourself, they’ll be deposited directly into your bank account, usually within one to three business days with online lenders.
  • Set up a payment plan. Stay on top of payments, and this loan can help you improve your credit score. If it fits your circumstances, set up automatic payments, which can help you pay on time and usually comes with an interest rate discount. If you’re paying back other debts at the same time, use a repayment method like the debt snowball or avalanche to determine where to direct your money whenever you’ve got extra to put toward your financial goals.

Where to Get a Bad Credit Loan

You don’t have to rely on the bank down the block. You can find a bad credit loan through several types of platforms, including:

  • Banks and credit unions. Institutions in your town or online could make personal loans and let you keep all of your finances in one place, including banking, credit cards, investing, loans and insurance.
  • Online lenders. These companies (all of the lenders in our list above) usually only offer loans and credit but not other banking or financial services — though there are some exceptions that focus on lending but also offer other services.
  • Marketplaces. Online marketplaces like Fiona, AmOnee or OppLoans aggregate offers for all types of loans and credit cards so you can see pre-approved rates with a single soft credit check. They often work with partner lenders that prefer good or excellent credit borrowers, so you might come up with nothing if you have a low credit score. But they can be a way to quickly assess your options without checking a bunch of lender sites.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Getting a Bad Credit Loan

What is the Easiest Type of Loan to Get with Bad Credit?

A secured loan can be a good option if you have a bad credit score. You put up collateral like a car, jewelry or something else of value to back up your loan, which reduces the lender’s risk. This can be a good way to get the funds you need and — when you repay on time — improve your credit. But take into account that it puts your asset at risk if you don’t repay.

Is There a Real Way to Get a Loan with Bad Credit?

Yes, secured loans are a traditional option for borrowers with low credit scores. And lots of companies have cropped up in recent years to offer innovative ways to assess a borrower’s creditworthiness without relying solely on a credit score. You’ll likely have to show stable income, education in a lucrative field and/or a history of on-time bill or rent payments. Check out Stilt, OneMain Financial and NetCredit above for loans with no minimum credit score

Can You Get a Loan With a Credit Score Below 500?

You may be eligible for a personal loan with a credit score below 500 with some companies. Most lenders require a minimum score of between 540 and 600, but companies including Stilt, OneMain Financial and NetCredit have no minimum credit score. You could qualify for a loan based on your education, income or bill payment history instead.

Which Loan is Easiest to Qualify For?

Secured personal loans are easier to qualify for than other types of loans, because you put up collateral to reduce a lender’s risk. You can also look into credit builder loans, where the lender withholds all or part of your loan in a savings account and releases it as you repay on time to help you build credit and get the money you need.

Where Can I Borrow Money Immediately?

Most online lenders can make personal loan funds available — deposited directly into your bank account — within one to three business days. Some will make the deposit as soon as the same day, depending on what time you apply. Many lenders offer loans as little as $1,000, so you can get enough to float you when money is tight without taking on a high-interest payday loan.

What is an Emergency Loan?

An “emergency loan” isn’t a specific type of loan product. It’s a term that refers to any loan you can get on short notice. It could be a personal loan, cash advance, home equity loan or a payday loan. Be careful borrowing money from a lender that advertises an “emergency loan” — they likely want to prey on borrowers with high need who are willing to accept bad terms like ultra-high interest. Try a traditional personal loan first if you can.

Contributor Dana Miranda is a Certified Educator in Personal Finance® who has written about work and money for publications including Forbes, The New York Times, CNBC, Insider, NextAdvisor and Inc. Magazine. 




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